Monthly Archives: October 2016

Let’s Learn How Often Should Replace an Accessory Drive Belt

Most vehicles have a rubber belt on the front of the engine that drives accessories such as the air-conditioning compressor, power steering pump and alternator. If this accessory drive belt (also called a V or serpentine belt) breaks, the battery won’t get charged, the air conditioner won’t blow cold air and the power steering will go out. In addition, if the belt drives the water pump, the engine could overheat.

Most manufacturers call for periodic inspection of the belt as part of scheduled maintenance, but few list a specific replacement interval, and inspection intervals vary widely.
Mercedes-Benz, for example, says to inspect the belt every two years or 20,000 miles, while Volkswagen says to check it every 40,000 miles. On most Ford vehicles, the manufacturer says to start inspecting it after 100,000 miles and then every 10,000 miles. On many GM vehicles, the first recommended inspection is at 150,000 miles or 10 years.

Though these belts often last many years, they can become cracked or frayed and need to be replaced. That’s why they should be inspected at least annually on vehicles that are more than a few years old. In addition, if a belt needs to be replaced, the pulleys and tensioners that guide the belt should be inspected to determine if they caused damage other than normal wear.

A belt that isn’t cracked or frayed may look like it’s in good shape, but grooves on the hidden side may be worn enough that the belt slips on the pulleys that drive the accessories. That will cause problems in systems that rely on the belt to keep things humming. For example, a slipping drive belt may cause the alternator to work intermittently or at reduced power, and the battery won’t get fully recharged as a result, perhaps triggering a warning light.

Another sign of a worn belt is a squealing noise under acceleration. That could indicate that the belt is slipping because of wear, a belt tensioner is loose or a pulley is out of alignment.

Most modern vehicles use belts made from ethylene propylene diene monomer, a synthetic rubber that lasts longer than older types of engine belts. Most belt manufacturers estimate the typical lifespan of an EPDM belt to be 50,000 to 60,000 miles, and some say it’s more than 100,000 miles. However, it can be hard to tell how worn one is with just a visual check because EPDM belts are less likely to crack or lose chunks of rubber than other types. They should be inspected by a professional.

Information About How Long Does a Car Battery in a New Car Last

Though battery problems are often associated with cold weather, Consumer Reports magazine says heat is a bigger enemy of car batteries and will take a bigger toll on performance and reserve capacity. The magazine recommends that vehicle owners in hotter parts of the country have their car battery tested after two years of ownership and then every year after. Those who live in colder areas can wait four years to test performance and capacity, and then every year after.

“Heat kills batteries,” according to John Banta, a Consumer Reports project leader and part of the team that tests batteries for the magazine. “Many times in cold climates your battery fails to start your car on a below-freezing day. The reason this happens is that the heat of the past summers has weakened your battery. When you use it in the cold, the starter requires more electrical current to turn over the cold engine with its thickened oil.”

Testing a battery’s performance and reserve (or amp-hour) capacity is not just a matter of seeing whether it will hold a charge (or checking the electric eye found on some batteries to see if it is green), so testing is best done by an auto technician.

Should You Know About Muffler Rattling

am3A loose bracket, rubber hanger or connector, or one that is badly corroded, can allow a muffler to rattle when you accelerate or drive on bumpy roads, or even when the car is stationary and idling.

A loose muffler can allow excessive movement in other components as well and increase the stress on those parts, so it can become more than an annoying noise if left unattended. If the muffler is hanging lower than normal, there’s also a risk that it could be broken off by hitting a bump or going over railroad tracks.

Modern exhaust systems are usually made of aluminized steel or stainless steel, but that doesn’t mean they or the parts that hold the exhaust components in place last forever. Heat, debris, road salt and moisture can all cause rust in the exhaust system.

Though a muffler rattle might be fixed simply by tightening a couple of bolts or replacing a broken hanger, the corrosion might be bad enough on the muffler or neighboring parts that they will have to be replaced.

A rattle or banging noise from the exhaust system might not be an external problem. Baffles or other components inside of mufflers can come loose and cause internal rattles.

In addition, the muffler may not be the only cause or even the culprit. Brackets and bolts securing tailpipes, heat shields above catalytic converters and other components can come loose, and catalytic converters can develop internal rattles when they go bad.

All Information About Air Conditioner Condenser

am2The air-conditioning condenser is a radiator positioned between the car’s grille and the engine-cooling radiator in which the gaseous refrigerant sheds heat and returns to a liquid state. The liquid refrigerant flows to the evaporator inside the dashboard, where it cools the cabin. Is your car not cool enough for you, at least temperature-wise? It might result from a clogged air-conditioning condenser or disabled cooling fan. A leak in the condenser also will result in a loss of refrigerant.
How do I know if my air-conditioning condenser has gone bad?
Well, it’ll be warmer than you want, or your windows will be foggy. If refrigerant leaks, the air conditioner won’t spit out much cold air, if any. Leaks can be located by adding an ultraviolet dye to the refrigerant. Air-conditioning output also can be diminished by crud that builds up on the front of the condenser, and cleaning the condenser may restore some performance.

How often should I replace my air-conditioning condenser?
As with other parts of the air-conditioning system, the condenser generally doesn’t need servicing as long as the system is producing cold air. Some mechanics recommend periodically inspecting the condenser for signs of damage or corrosion and doing an external cleaning or internal flush if needed.

Why do I have to replace my air-conditioning condenser?
Because it’s an integral part of your air-conditioning system, and you won’t be comfortable, or be able to see, if it’s broken. Some condensers can be cleaned externally with a hose, and others can be cleared of sludge with an internal flush, but many mechanics recommend replacing a condenser that is clogged or corroded.